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MCITP: Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Administrator

I passed the Lync 70-665 exam today so apart from the paperwork, I am now an MCITP:Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Administrator. 


I don't intend to break the NDA, so enough to say, prepare for a lot of reading.

As I studied, I created a guide to the various subject areas, available here and used Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Unleashed book.

Unofficial Study Guide for Exam 70-665: PRO: Microsoft Lync Server 2010, Administrator


This will be a living post as I seek out information covering the topics of the Lync Administrator exam, 70-665.


Latest update: 
  • Phone Usage Records
  • Bandwidth requirements
  • E911
  • Private Lines
  • CAC
  • Media Bypass
  • Plan for DR - Bare Metal Restore
  • Monitoring objective
  • Designing Sites and Pools

Skills Being Measured This exam measures your ability to accomplish the technical tasks listed below. The percentages indicate the relative weight of each major topic area on the exam.



Designing a Topology for Lync Server 2010 (25 percent)

Designing a Conferencing and Enterprise Voice Infrastructure (25 percent)

  • Design a dial plan.
  • Design for voice routing.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • PSTN breakout points; 
      • PBX phones; 
      • trunk routing; media gateway; 
      • least cost/alternate routing
  • Define voice policies.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
  • Define conference policies.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • controlling usage; 
      • system capacity considerations
  • Design for Response Group Services (RGS).
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • workflow; contact objects; 
      • agents and queues; 
      • groups
  • Design for emergency services implementation.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • Enhanced 911 (E911)
      • SIP trunk emergency service providers; 
      • location policies; 
      • Location Information Service (LIS) wiremap; 
      • analyze network mapping
  • Plan for devices.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • considerations for different endpoint types, including analog devices, common area phones, and standalone devices; 
      • DNS and DHCP requirements
Planning for External Dependencies and Migration (24 percent)

    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • public and private certificates; 
      • Subject Alternate Names (SANs)
  • Plan for Exchange Unified Messaging (UM).
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • specify requirements to integrate Exchange UM with Lync Server 2010; 
      • Exchange UM dependencies; 
      • design Exchange UM dial plans
  • Plan for migration.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • configuration requirements; 
      • side-by-side migration; 
      • Edge migration; 
      • meeting considerations; 
      • client limitation considerations
Planning for High Availability and Business Continuity (26 percent)

  • Plan for high availability.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • choosing Survivable Branch Appliance (SBA) vs. Standard vs. Enterprise in high availability; 
      • number of servers and pools required; 
      • server redundancy
  • Plan for load balancing.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • DNS; 
      • Hardware Load Balancing (HLB)
  • Plan for disaster recovery.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
  • Plan for system monitoring.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • synthetic transactions
      • identifying components to monitor; 
      • monitoring technologies such as Microsoft System Center Operations Manager
  • Plan for site resiliency.
    • This objective may include but is not limited to: 
      • SBA; 
      • backup registrar

Lync Phone Usage Records


Lync uses Phone Usage Records to define calling privileges for Enterprise Voice users. Phone Usage Records are simply labels, which can be given descriptive names such as 'Local Calls' or 'Calls to Mobile' or 'International Calls'. One or more Phone Usage Records are then added to an Enterprise Voice Policy which can be applied to users. The Phone Usage Records are also associated with outbound call routes. This is the 'glue' that applies the call privileges or restrictions to a user. The collection of Phone Usage Records in the Voice Policy determines all the authorised routes allowed to a user. When a user places a call, Lync Server matches the dialed number with a route in the authorized route list. If a matching route is found, the call is made. If no matching route is found, the call is not made.

The graphic below shows a simple example. We have two Enterprise Voice users. Mr Big is the manager and is allowed to make calls to National, Mobile and International numbers. Joe Bloggs is not to be allowed to make international calls. We already have outbound routes to National, Mobile and International (the examples shows Irish numbering where all national calls begin with a single 0, mobiles begin with 08 and international calls begin with 00). We create two Enterprise Voice Policy records called Manager and Staff. We assign these to Mr Big and Joe as appropriate. The Manager policy has Phone Usage Records called 'National', 'Mobile' and 'International', while the Staff policy only has 'National' and 'Mobile' Phone Usage records.

When either user makes a 'National' call, the Phone Usage Record of the 'National' route is compared against the list of Phone Usage Records assigned to the user, through the Voice Policy. In this case, both users will have a match and the call is allowed. When Mr Big makes an International call, again the Phone Usage Record for the route appears in his list of Phone Usage assignments and the call proceeds. On the other hand when Joe attempts an International call, the usage record on the route ('International') does not appear on his list of Phone Usage Records and the call is barred.

Generally, Phone Usage Records are created for two reasons – to restrict calls because of cost (e.g. International calls) or to restrict calls to inappropriate numbers (e.g. premium content services). In the example shown, the user Joe either needs to make calls to mobile (cell) numbers or the call cost to these are the same as calls to National numbers and therefore there is no point in restricting the calls. However, premium calls are generally not appropriate for business calls and are therefore restricted. This is shown in the graphic by the fact that the 'Premium' phone usage record is not applied to any Voice Policy – neither user could make Premium calls.

More Lync Resource Kit chapters available

Resource Kit Book Chapters:

Microsoft Lync 2010 Adoption and Training Kit Released

Microsoft have released a Lync Adoption and Training kit.

The kit provides:
  • A workbook that provides step-by-step guidance for each phase of the rollout and adoption process
  • Adoption and training resources, such as primers, email templates, and templates for a custom Lync 2010 intranet site to help organizations successfully roll out Lync
  • Modular, reusable, rebrandable, and in most cases, customizable user education and training materials, including frequently asked questions, Quick Start guides, how-to videos, Work Smart guides, and training videos
  • Buzzworthy applications such as IM an Expert and learning tools such as the Lync How-to that you can use to generate user excitement and drive the adoption of Lync

Hardware virtualisation support for Exchange UM Announced

Microsoft have announced support for the Exchange 2010 SP1 Unified Messaging role on hardware virtualisation. The Technet blog article is here and the official Exchange 2010 system requirements are available here.

Specifically, the UM role has the following requirements -
  • Four virtual processors are required for the virtual machine. Memory should be sized using standard best practices guidance.
  • Four physical processor cores are available for use at all times by each Unified Messaging role virtual machine. This requirement means that no processor oversubscription can be in use. This requirement affects the ability of the Unified Messaging role virtual machine to utilize physical processor resources.

Lync Server Troubleshooting

When you are looking at a system that isn't working and have a customer waiting for an update it's good to have a plan. Stale Hansen has given his thoughts on how to go about troubleshooting a Lync issue

Lync Bandwidth Requirements

The bandwidth requirements for Lync are difficult to determine for a given customer installation especially since the nature of Lync is to change how people communicate. The starting point for understanding the network bandwidth requirements are documented on Technet and Microsoft have released a bandwidth calculator.

The bandwidth usage is determined by a number of factors, the Codec used (along with overhead), the Stream activity level and for video, the resolution/quality and frame rate.

Audio Codec Bandwidth

Audio codec

Scenarios

Audio payload bitrate

Add IP header only

Also add UDP, RTP and SRTP

Also add FEC

RTAudio Wideband

Peer-to-peer

29.0

45.0

57.0

86.0

RTAudio Narrowband

Peer-to-peer, PSTN

11.8

27.8

39.8

51.6

G.722

Conferencing

64.0

80.0

95.6

159.6

G.711

PSTN

64.0

80.0

92.0

156.0

Siren

Conferencing

16.0

32.0

47.6

63.6

The bandwidth rates are in Kbps (as are all bandwidth rates in this post) and assume 100% stream activity, which is not the normal case. (Note: The online Technet document shows KBPS (i.e. Kilo Bytes per second for the base Audio payload bitrate, it should be Kbps – reference Wikipedia)

Video Resolution Bandwidth

Video codec

Resolution

Maximum video payload bitrate

Minimum video payload bitrate

RTVideo

Main Video CIF

250

50

RTVideo

Main Video VGA

600

350

RTVideo

Main Video HD

1500

800

RTVideo

Panoramic Video

350

50

The maximum bitrate values shown (Kbps) are applicable for maximum frame rate and maximum quality. The minimum bitrate is for 1fps. HD Video is only available for peer-to-peer sessions. By default, only SD video is allowed, to allow HD video at Global or Site level use Set-CsMediaConfiguration –Identity:Global -MaxVideoRateAllowed HD720p15m

Bandwidth usage by participant

The raw bandwidth specified above is used only when the situation requires it, in other words, depending on what individual users are doing with the session determines their bandwidth requirements.

Peer-to-Peer

  • Endpoints send audio streams only when the users speak.
  • Both participants receive audio streams.
  • If video is used, both endpoints send and receive video streams during the entire call.

Conference

  • Endpoints send audio streams only when the users speak.
  • All participants receive audio streams.
  • If video is used, only two endpoints send a video stream at a time (the active speaker and the previous active speaker).
  • If video is used, all participants receive video streams.

Stream Activity Levels

Scenario

Media

Estimated stream activity (%)

Peer-to-peer sessions

Audio

61

Peer-to-peer sessions

Main video CIF

84

Peer-to-peer sessions

Main video VGA

83

Peer-to-peer sessions

Main video HD

80

Peer-to-peer sessions

Panoramic video

74

Conferencing

Audio

43

Conferencing

Main video CIF

84

Conferencing

Main video VGA

83

Conferencing

Main video HD

80

Conferencing

Panoramic video

74

PSTN

Audio

65

This is based on customer data gathered by Microsoft.

Added to the media bandwidth requirements is the requirement for control traffic in the form of Real Time Control Protocol (RTCP)

RTCP Bandwidth

Media

RTCP maximum bandwidth

Audio

5

Video

10

Overall Bandwidth by session type

Combining all this information together, Microsoft have come up with a table of maximum bandwidth utilisation (with and without FEC) and also typical bandwidth utilisation.

Audio/Video Capacity Planning for Peer-to-Peer Sessions

Media

Codec

Typical stream bandwidth

Maximum stream bandwidth without FEC

with FEC

Audio

RTAudio Wideband

39.8

62

91

Audio

RTAudio Narrowband

29.3

44.8

56.6

Main video CIF

RTVideo

220

260

Not applicable

Main video VGA

RTVideo

508

610

Not applicable

Main video HD

RTVideo

1210

1510

Not applicable

Panoramic video

RTVideo

269

360

Not applicable

Audio/Video Capacity Planning for Conferences

Media

Typical codec

Typical stream bandwidth

Maximum stream bandwidth without FEC

with FEC

Audio

G.722

46.1

100.6

164.6

Audio

Siren

25.5

52.6

68.6

Main video CIF

RTVideo

220

260

Not applicable

Main video VGA

RTVideo

508

610

Not applicable

Panoramic video

RTVideo

269

360

Not applicable

Audio Capacity Planning for PSTN

Media

Typical codec

Typical stream bandwidth

Maximum stream bandwidth without FEC

with FEC

Audio

G.711

64.8

97

161

Audio

RTAudio Narrowband

30.9

44.8

56.6

E911 in Lync Server

I admit that I am no expert on E911 since it is a US based standard. I therefore personally only need to know about it for the 70-665 exam. So I will let others explain how it works and how it is configured...


Private Lines


Private lines is a Enterprise Voice feature added to Lync Server 2010. Private lines are a secondary, incoming only number assigned to an existing Lync user. A private line is usually used by company executives. Calls to the private line always ring through even when the user sets their status to Do Not Disturb, with a special ringtone. Also private line numbers do not appear in the address book and are not searchable.

Private lines are configured through Powershell

Set-CsUser -Identity "sip:joe@contoso.com" -PrivateLine "Tel:+14255551212".

CAC and Media Bypass in Lync Server 2010



Within a Lync Server 2010 deployment there are a number of features which have been introduced to meet the needs of an Enterprise class VoIP solution; namely Call Admission Control, Media Bypass and E911. This post will investigate the first two of these features.

Each of these features is based on the networking configuration of Lync Server 2010. Before configuring any of the features the network configuration has to be defined. Lync views the network as a number of Network Regions, each with one or more Network Sites connected by Network Links.

  • Network regions consist of multiple network sites. A network region represents a network hub or backbone. Network regions are interconnected through a wide area network (WAN) link. A network region is a collection of sites inter-connected by high speed links. Essentially, the sites within a region don't need to have CAC applied because the available bandwidth is abundant. Each region has a central Lync Site that manages the bandwidth. A single Lync site can be associated with multiple Network regions.
    A note on terminology: Microsoft documentation gives examples of network regions, such as North America, Europe and Asia-Pac. However, if the enterprise has a branch location with restricted bandwidth to the HQ or Data Centre, then the branch site would be a region.
  • Network sites identify locations within a network region. A network site represents a physical location that belongs to an organization such as a branch office or a regional office.

     
  • Network links refer to the WAN link that connects two network regions. Such WAN links have limited bandwidth capacity compared to LAN links; therefore, call admission control is enforced on such network links.

     
  • Network route refers to the network regions traversed between two given endpoint regions.

     
This information is probably already available with the enterprise's Network support team.

Call Admission Control (CAC) is defined by a call admission policy which defines the audio and video bandwidth allocated over a network route.

Call admission control policy defines the following information:

  • Maximum total bandwidth to allocate for audio
  • Maximum total bandwidth to allocate for video
  • Maximum bandwidth that can be allocated for a single audio call (session)
  • Maximum bandwidth that can be allocated for a single video call (session)
Call admission control is enforced at the client level by the receiving client and only if that client is Lync 2010 (not Office Communicator).

Each network site is comprised of one or more subnets. The subnets specified in the Lync configuration must be the subnet as configured on the client, super-netting or subnet aggregation is not supported. Also, the external IP address of the AV Edge server(s) must be added with a 32 bit subnet mask.

How Media Bypass Works

When you enable media bypass, a unique bypass ID is automatically generated for a network region and for all network sites without bandwidth constraints within that region. Sites with bandwidth constraints within the region and sites connected to the region over WAN links with bandwidth constraints are each assigned their own unique bypass IDs.

When a user makes a call to the PSTN, the Mediation Server compares the bypass ID of the client subnet with the bypass ID of the gateway subnet. If the two bypass IDs match, media bypass is used for the call. If the bypass IDs do not match, media for the call must flow through the Mediation Server.

When a user receives a call from the PSTN, the user's client compares its bypass ID to that of the PSTN gateway. If the two bypass IDs match, media flows directly from the gateway to the client, bypassing the Mediation Server.

At the Global level, media bypass configuration has two options: Always Bypass or Use Site and Region Information. Always Bypass is used where there is no need for CAC. Always Bypass assigns all networks the same bypass ID.

  • The system automatically assigns a single unique bypass ID to each region.
  • Any site connected to a region over a WAN link without bandwidth constraints inherits the same bypass ID as the region.
  • A site associated with the region over a WAN link with constrained bandwidth is assigned a different bypass ID from that of the region.
  • Subnets associated with each site inherit the bypass ID for that site.
Media bypass and CAC work together to manage bandwidth control for call media. Media bypass facilitates media flow over well-connected links; CAC manages traffic on links with bandwidth constraints. If you enable CAC, you cannot select Always Bypass, and vice-versa, because the two configurations are mutually exclusive.

Windows 2008 R2 Bare Metal Restore

A very interesting and informative article on the Bare Metal Restore capabilities of Windows Server 2008 R2 is available on the Technet Ask the Core Team blog.

Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Resources–Part I

Aviraj Ajgekar of Microsoft has pulled together in one place a number of Lync 2010 resources, the original article is published here.

Resources
Lync 2010 Attendee
Microsoft Lync 2010 Attendee is a conferencing client that allows users without Microsoft Lync 2010 installed, to participate in online meetings. A user with an administrator account on the computer can install Lync 2010 Attendee so that users of the computer can join Microsoft Lync Server 2010-hosted meetings.
Lync Web Scheduler
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler provides a Web-based online Lync meeting scheduling and management experience for Lync Server 2010.
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 New Features Overview
This download contains the New Features Overview chapter of the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Resource Kit book. This book is currently being developed. Chapters will be available for download while this book is being completed.
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Resource Kit
The Lync Server 2010 Resource Kit is the technical reference for the product. This book extends the product planning, deploying, and managing documentation in the Lync Technical Library. This book serves as a companion to the product documentation to learn how the product works under the hood.
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Technical Overview
This download contains the Technical Overview chapter of the Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Resource Kit book. This book is currently being developed. Chapters will be available for download while this book is being completed.
Lync Server 2010 Administration Guide
This document contains procedures and guidance for administering a Lync Server 2010 deployment.
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Active Directory Guide
This document guides you through the process of preparing Active Directory for Microsoft Lync Server 2010 and includes the Active Directory schema reference.
Lync Server 2010 Capacity Calculator
A spreadsheet for calculating a user’s hardware requirements based on information about users and traffic.
Lync Server 2010, Planning Tool
The Microsoft Lync Server 2010, Planning Tool provides prescriptive guidance to get you started with planning your topology.
Lync 2010 Bandwidth Calculator
A Microsoft Excel spreadsheet that calculates WAN bandwidth requirements for a Lync Server deployment based on administrator-specified user profiles and network information.
Lync Server 2010 Visio Stencil
This stencil provides over 125 shapes to help you create a visual presentation of your Lync Server architecture.
Lync Server 2010, Best Practices Analyzer
The Microsoft Lync Server 2010, Best Practices Analyzer is designed for administrators who want to determine the overall health of their Lync Server environment.
Lync 2010 SDK
The Lync 2010 SDK is the client-side API set that enables the integration and extension of Lync experiences.
Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Security Guide
The Security Guide provides guidelines for assessing and managing security risks to your Lync Server 2010 deployment.

Understanding and Troubleshooting Exchange Integration

Microsoft have published a document describing the integration of Lync with Exchange.

An Alternative guide to 70-665 preparation

Enrigue Lima has published a prep guide based on technet resources for the Lync 70-665 exam

Lync Powershell Cmdlets Mindmaps

The guys at the Technet Blog describe a great aid to those of us struggling through the hundreds of Lync Powershell Cmdlets. Tom Arbuthnot has developed a Flash based online interactive application that groups the cmdlets by category and verb. Tom's article is available here and there are mindmaps with category and verb views.



    
Lync Cmdlets by Category
Lync Cmdlets by Verb

Microsoft Buys Skype for $8.5 Billion. Why, Exactly?

This is a technology focused blog but the acquisition of Skype by Microsoft has the potential for changing the game in relation to Microsoft's UC strategy. The ability for Skype to break out to the PSTN is something would have needed to be implemented for Lync Online, now Microsoft have a head start. An interesting analysis of the move is available on Wired.

The Lync Server Databases

A great explanation of the various Lync Server databases is available on Inside Lync blog by Curtis Johnstone

Lync Monitoring role

The Lync monitoring role gathers data from Lync endpoints, servers and Lync phones. The data specifies media quality and usage data and stores them in a SQL database. The server also provides access to the data trough a reporting engine.

Requirements
To deploy the monitoring role requires a server (hardware and software spec as per all other Lync roles). A full edition of SQL server is required, which can be the same server as the backend of an Enterprise pool. Message Queuing is required on the monitoring server.

Collocation
The monitoring role can be co-located with the Archiving role. Full details on collocation can be found here.

Capacity

One Monitoring server can be associated with multiple pools. A single Monitoring server can capture data for 250,000 users. Based on the Lync Server user model, the CDR database grows 31.5 KB per user per day, and the QoE database grows 28 KB per user per day.

The Monitoring server database size can be calculated from the following formula
DB size = (DB growth per user per day) * (Number of users) * (Number of days)

Installation
The Monitoring role comprises a number of components:
  • Data Collection Agent - automatically installed on all FE servers
  • Monitoring server - collects data sent by FE via Message Queuing and stores it in the database
  • SQL database - QoEMetrics Schema details and LcsCDR Schema details
  • Message Queuing - installed on Monitoring server as well as FE server
  • SCOM management pack (optional)
  • Monitoring Server Reports (optional)
 Installation requires:
  • Iinstalling and configuring MQ
  • deploy SQL and SQl Reports Service
  • define Monitoring roles in the Lync Topology and publish
  • Install Lync Monitoring servers
  • Install Monitoring Server reports
 Supported SQL Server versions
The same SQL Server versions are supported as for pool database
  • SQL 2008 Std/Ent SP1
  • SQL 2005 Std/Ent SP3
[Note:SQL 2008 R2 now officially supported but the documentation has not all been updated and for exam purposes for a while we can assume any questions will reference 2005/2008 only.]

SQL Server 2008 Express and SQL Server 2005 Express Edition are not supported.

 
You can use the following cmdlets to configure Monitoring Server:
  • To configure CDR settings, use New-, Set-, Get- and Remove-CsCdrConfiguration. 
  • To configure the QoE settings, use New-, Set-, Get- and Remove-CsQoEConfiguration.

Lync Updates April 2011

Updates released for Lync April 2011, info here

LyncAddContacts - add standard company contacts to Lync

Jeff Guillet over at EXPTA blog has written a script called LyncAddContacts.

It provides similar functionality as the OCS Resource Kit tools, LCSAddContacts.

To quote Jeff - "The purpose of LyncAddContacts is to add the same contact groups and contacts to multiple users programmatically.  For example, you may want to import a contact group called "Company Contacts"  that contains contacts for everyone in the company."

Essentially you need to manually create a template user with the required contacts, use LyncAddContacts to export this configuration and then use LyncAddContacts to import the contacts into each user or OU.

Microsoft Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler

Lync Server 2010 Web Scheduler provides a Web-based online Lync meeting scheduling and management experience for Lync Server 2010. It is available for download from Microsoft.

 Lync Web Scheduler is a resource kit tool for Microsoft® Lync Server 2010. It provides a Web-based alternative to the add-in for the Microsoft Office Outlook® messaging and collaboration client for the purpose of scheduling a meeting using Lync Server 2010. It also provides a browser-based conference management experience that includes operations such as the following:
  • Scheduling a new online Lync meeting.
  • Listing all existing Lync Server 2010 meetings that the user has organized.
  • Viewing and modifying details of an existing meeting.
  • Deleting an existing meeting.
  • Sending an email invitation to meeting participants by using a configured SMTP mail server.
  • Joining an existing conference.
Installation
This is a very simple application to install. Run the WebScheduler.msi file on (all) the Front End servers. The only configuration required is to set the SMTP server to be used to send emails. This configuration is done in IIS Manager. Navigate to the Lync External Web Site and expand to list all web applications. Select Scheduler and click SMTP E-mail. Enter the SMTP Server address, port and authentication settings. Repeat for the Lync Internal Web Site. The External site needs to be publish through the Reverse Proxy, if required.

Using Lync Web Scheduler
Access the application on https://<internal pool FQDN>/scheduler or https://<external pool FQDN>/scheduler.

    Lync Dial Plans and Normalization Rules


    For Enterprise Voice, Lync requires a Dial Plan to be defined. The Dial Plan will have a number of normalization rules that convert the number typed in by the user (or selected by them from an Office application) and convert it to E.164 format. Normalization rules use .Net regular expressions. The objective is to match what the user has typed in and apply a translation to convert it to E.164. The dial plan is configured under Voice Routing in the Lync Control Panel. The dial plan can be scoped at the Site, Pool or User level.

    Regex Basics

    There are a small number of Regex elements used in Lync Normalization rules are these are described here.

    element Meaning Example Explanation of example 
    Match at beginning of string ^123 Match the digits 123 at the beginning of the string 
    () Captures the matched subexpression (456) Capture what is between the parentheses into a numbered variable, starting at 1 which can be accessed as $n, eg $1
    Specifies zero or more matches\d(*)
    Specifies one or more matches\d(+)
    Specifies zero or one matches\d(+)
    {n}Specifies exactly n matches\d{4}Match 4 digits
    {n,}Specifies at least n matches\d{3,} Match at least 3 digits (with no limit to number of digits matched 
    {n,m}Specifies at least n, but no more than m, matches.\d{3,6} Match at least 3 digits but no more than 6 digits 
    \d Matches any decimal digit ^\d Match any decimal digit (at the beginning of a string)
    |Matches any one of the terms separated by the | (vertical bar) character 134 | 135 Match either the string 134 or the string 135 
    $The match must occur at the end of the string^(123)$Match exactly digits 123 (and not 1234)

     

    Translation

    Regex is used for translations following matches. In the case of Lync, this allows the addition of a leading + symbol and the insertion of digits, either from the matched string (S1) or fixed digits.

    Lync provides a normalization rule builder that guides you through the process of defining regular expressions that will cater for most circumstances. The generated regular expression can be hand modified to handle more complex situations.

    The normalization rule builder has four steps, steps 1 and 2 match the pattern and steps 3 and 4 perform the translation.

    • Starting digits: (Optional) Indicate the leading digits of dialed numbers you want the pattern to match. For example, type 234 if you want the pattern to match dialed numbers beginning with 234. This will result in a match pattern of ^(234)
    • Length: Indicate the number of digits in the matching pattern and select whether you want the pattern to match this length exactly \d{4}, match dialed numbers that are at least this length (\d{3}\d+), or match dialed numbers of any length (\d*).
    • Digits to remove: (Optional) Indicate the number of starting digits to be removed from dialed numbers you want the pattern to match. This will change how digits are captured into variables.
    • Digits to add: (Optional) Indicate digits to be added to dialed numbers you want the pattern to match.
    If the pattern to match or the translation rule does not meet your exact requirements, manual editing is allowed.

    The normalisation rules are checked in order from top down, the first match is the only translation performed.

    Example Normalization Rules

    NameStarting DigitsLengthDigits to removeDigits to addPattern to matchTranslation rule
    4 Digit Extension3Exactly 40+35320911^(3\d{3})$+35320911$1
    International Numbers00At least 22+^00(\d*)$+$1
    National Numbers0At least 11+353^0(\d*)$+353$1
    Emergency NumberNANANANA^(999$|112$)+$1
    (Note: these rules are specific to Ireland, Comreg Numbering Plan specifies 020 91X XXXX for 'Drama' use, similar to 555 area code in US)


     

    Dial Plan Testing

    In the Lync Control Panel, we can test individual normalization rules or we can create a series of tests that can be saved and run to ensure our normalization and routing functions correctly.

    NameDialed number to testExpected translation
    Local extension3001+353209113001
    International Number0018095556789+18095556789
    National Number0209113002+353209113001
    Emergency Number112+112
    Emergency Number999+999